Read Part 1: “Hosting a Retreat: What Makes a Successful Retreat Host?”

pencil checklist checkboxes

Potential Obstacles to Hosting Successful Retreats and Suggestions for Pivoting

  1. You don’t have anything to teach or not enough to fill up several full days.
    If you don’t have something to teach, consider retreats where you, and possibly co-hosts or contractors, pair your services with other activities and adventures.
     
    For example, if you offer massage, spa treatments, or acupuncture, mix those services with adventures, like boat rides, kayaking, snorkeling, rock climbing, hiking, biking, tours, crafts, etc. This may mean you’re contracting out to another host for those activities, but it could also mean attracting more participants. Get creative! Think of what suits your clientele.
  2. There’s not enough of a market for the type of retreat you want to host.
    How can you re-target to a larger market? It doesn’t have to be a huge market; niching down is actually smart. But there needs to be enough people in the pool to generate interest and registrations. How you can adjust your idea so it appeals to a bigger audience?
  3. Your target customer can’t afford the retreat, let alone multiple retreats.
    If this is the case, consider adjusting your retreats and marketing to target participants who can afford it.  Or, if your clients are in your area, consider having a local 1-day retreat, instead of an out-of-state 4 day retreat at an expensive retreat center.
  4. Your target customer can’t afford the retreat, let alone multiple retreats.
    If this is the case, consider adjusting your retreats and marketing to target participants who can afford it.  Or, if your clients are in your area, consider having a local 1-day retreat, instead of an out-of-state 4 day retreat at an expensive retreat center.
  5. Your target customer isn’t the type to be interested in a retreat.
    It may be that you need to build more of a community around your brand. This way, participants get excited to reunite with those they already know and like.
  6. Your topic can be better taught or learned in shorter sessions (focus group, 1-day workshop, etc.)
  7. You’re doing it for you, not your clients.
    Don’t make your clients an afterthought.  Consider what would serve them best, what they would value most from a retreat or intensive.  Allow their goals, comforts and preferences to come first.
  8. You’re doing it for you, not your clients.
    Don’t make your clients an afterthought.  Consider what would serve them best, what they would value most from a retreat or intensive.  Allow their goals, comforts and preferences to come first.
  9. You’re just in it for the money.
    If so, this will show, and you won’t inspire people. Since inspiration is one of the big reasons people want to attend retreats, you’ll want to have a passion for what you’re bringing them.
  10. You haven’t traveled much, or haven’t experienced work travel.
    If your retreats will be destination retreats (not local to you), then you want to know what it takes to host a retreat after you just traveled or while traveling. You want to be sure you can handle supporting a group in a potentially unfamiliar location, city, or country. If you haven’t done much travel yet, start with local/domestic retreats. In the meantime, work toward hosting retreats abroad by attending a couple that appeal to you. You’ll get the hang of the travel, learn what worked and didn’t about the retreats, and can interview or network with the hosts!
  11. You’re not comfortable teaching to a group.
    If you want to share your gifts in a retreat setting, this is something you can work on. However, if you’re not sure you want to be the teacher, but still want to host retreats and go to them, you could envision enlisting teachers to host your retreat for you. You might also consider starting a retreat organizing business. You could build up your expertise on retreat hosting and marketing and act as a facilitator to retreat hosts. You’d earn a healthy commission on the profits and likely be able to attend. However, because you shouldn’t be in it for just the money, you should also enjoy organizing events.

 
A retreat business takes time to build and establish, but you must start somewhere.

Build the following:

  1. Network
  2. Email list
  3. Strategic partnerships
  4. Advertising and email campaigns
  5. Website and search engine optimization

Want to learn more about hosting successful retreats?

Download my FREE Successful Retreats Cheat Sheet

– Learn what it takes to be a successful retreat host
– Where to host your first retreat and why
– The best times to open and close registration
– The crucial element to include in your curriculum that too many hosts overlook
– The must-haves for your retreat website or landing page
– My hot tip for successful retreat marketing

GET YOUR CHEAT SHEET NOW!

 
 
This is Part 2 of the series “Hosting a Retreat”. Read Part 1: “Hosting a Retreat: What Makes a Successful Retreat Host?”.

Leave a Reply